Barrier tape instead of mulled wine stand – the big Christmas market frustration


Berlin – There were often stark regional differences in the corona numbers. But never before has the republic been so divided on the Corona rules.

On early Monday evening, Berlin’s current mayor Michael Müller (56, SPD) opened the Christmas market at the Gedächtniskirche – mulled wine, bratwurst, bright lights. The other markets in the capital are also open – some with mask compulsory, some with 2G rules.

Hesse’s largest Christmas market in front of the Frankfurt Römer relies on a larger area, fewer stalls and thus more distance.

On the other hand, all Christmas markets in Saxony and Bavaria were slowed down by the drastic Corona situation. For Brandenburg, the end of the Christmas markets was sealed on Monday.



The Christmas market in front of the Dresden Frauenkirche will not take place this year eitherPhoto: Robert Michael / dpa

In Baden-Württemberg (e.g. Heilbronn) and Thuringia (e.g. Jena) only the Christmas markets in hotspot areas have so far been canceled. Consolation for the retailers: At the federal-state summit, it was agreed that there should be economic aid for Christmas markets again, which are due to the corona.


Also canceled again: the famous Nuremberg Christkindlesmarkt

Also canceled again: the famous Nuremberg Christkindlesmarkt Photo: Karina Palzer

Barrier tape instead of mulled wine stand

▶ ︎ Lou Tempel (26) has her Thai friend Arisara (25) as a guest for the first time: “I wanted to show her our beautiful Striezelmarkt – it’s such a shame that it wasn’t allowed to open now. I can understand the decision based on the infection situation, but not the decision-making of politicians. The situation was foreseeable … To cancel the dealers who had already set up everything at such short notice is incomprehensible. “


Lou Tempel (26, left) and Arisara (25)

Lou Tempel (26, left) and Arisara (25)Photo: Picxell

▶ ︎ Ina (52) and Wolfgang Welke (49) are tourists from Baden-Württemberg who came to Dresden especially for the Christmas markets. She says: “We had booked a weekend in Meißen and wanted to extend it until Tuesday to take a look at the beautiful markets here. The rejection almost brought tears to my eyes. I don’t understand the Christmas market ban either, what should happen in the fresh air? But the ban on tourist accommodation in Saxony hit us even harder. We had to check out early on Monday at the hotel, feeling like we were chased from the yard.


Ina (52) and Wolfgang Welke (49)

Ina (52) and Wolfgang Welke (49)Photo: Picxell

▶ ︎ Ursula and Hans-Steffen Bosse (both 77) from Dresden, strolling through the historic Christmas market on the Frauenkirchen: “The cancellation at such short notice was brutal! We are extremely sorry for the dealers, they are losing so much money. But even so, the markets would have been a ray of hope for people at this time. We are very sad to see everything dark here – it is really tragic. “


Ursula and Hans-Steffen Bosse (both 77)

Ursula and Hans-Steffen Bosse (both 77)Photo: Picxell

▶ ︎ Fritz Barthelmes from Nuremberg wanted to sell Christmas figurines and nativity scenes at the market. He says: “The late cancellation throws us back. We have been ordering goods for a long time, we have to pay for them now. “


Fritz Barthelmes

Fritz BarthelmesPhoto: Karina Palzer


Hannelore Schweizer (81) decorated her stand in Nuremberg for free:

Hannelore Schweizer (81) decorated her stand in Nuremberg for free: “I’m ready and done”Photo: Karina Palzer

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