Refugee Ukrainians in Germany – We already have work!


They fled from Putin’s war of aggression on their homeland. Now tens of thousands of Ukrainians in Germany are safe – and looking for a new beginning.

Some of them have already found a job with us after a short time. This is possible because the refugees have received a residence permit in Germany, which usually allows them to start work immediately.

The new employees are a blessing for many industries! There is a nationwide shortage of skilled and unskilled workers, especially in the skilled trades and in gastronomy. BamS presents four young Ukrainian women who work in Germany – three of them even in the same professions as in their home country.

Alexandra brings dishes from home to us

Until Putin attacked her homeland, Alexandra (21, photo above) lived happily in Odessa, working as a cook: “When the war started, I couldn’t sleep for days, heard explosions five or six times a day and these alarm sirens again and again. That’s why I fled to Poland by car, then on to Frankfurt by plane. Many of my friends died in the war. It’s so awful!”

The young woman stayed with Maik Delling (41) and his family in Heimbach-Teningen (Ba.-Wü.). He runs the castle cafe there. Alexandra: “I’ve been working since this week, baking Ukrainian carrot cake and putting together a menu with dishes from my homeland. I am very happy that I can now be here in Germany, I will do a German course after Easter. But as soon as the war is over, I’m going back to Odessa.”

Irina makes cakes for special occasions


Irina (29) has been working in a Berlin pastry shop since the end of March

Irina (29) has been working in a Berlin pastry shop since the end of MarchPhoto: Parvets

Immediately after the start of the war, Irina Palii (29) arrived in Berlin with her husband and their one-year-old daughter. Barely ten days later, she started working as a confectioner at the “Datscha Bistro” in the capital. “I’m grateful to be able to do what I love,” says Irina. She had already worked as a confectioner in her hometown of Odessa. Her specialty: creative cakes for special occasions. Her new boss, Faina Kaplan (51), also hired Irina’s husband. “The most important thing is the feeling that we have work and aren’t going hungry,” says the Ukrainian.

Ivanka has a green thumb


Ivanka (19) has been working in a horticulture company in Bavaria since Monday

Ivanka (19) has been working in a horticulture company in Bavaria since MondayPhoto: Robert Gongoll

Ivanka (19) and her partner Gena (33) were on a beach holiday in Hurghada (Egypt) when war broke out in their homeland: “We couldn’t go home to Rivne in western Ukraine. Our plane landed in Budapest, we then took the train to Munich.”

There they were mediated by helpers to Siegfried Kahl (63). He is the head of a horticultural company (20 employees) in Schmidgaden (Bavaria). Ivanka and Gena have lived with him ever since. They absolutely wanted to work and have been officially allowed to do so since last Monday – eight hours a day.

Ivanka: “We are very grateful! But we pray that all this war horror ends and that we can go home soon.”


Refugee Ukrainians in Germany: We already have work!
Photo: BILD

Iryna teaches at a community school


Iryna (38) calls her brother and mother, who are still in Kyiv, every day

Iryna (38) calls her brother and mother, who are still in Kyiv, every dayPhoto: Marcus Brandt/dpa

It is only four weeks since Iryna Mikulska (38) had to flee Kyiv from the Russian war of aggression.

Now the Ukrainian lives in Hamburg – and has a job! She teaches at the Harksheide community school (students from the 5th grade) in Norderstedt (Schleswig-Holstein). The qualified English teacher helps 16 children and young people who recently fled Ukraine. “I’m the interpreter,” says Iryna.

The Ukrainian is very happy about her new job: “I don’t just want to be a teacher, I also want to be a friend.” And: “I’m grateful for my work.”

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