Germany out of breath: Zeynep rages through Germany at 162 km/h


Twice storm, twice Germany out of breath!

Hurricane “Ylenia” first blew through Germany on Thursday with wind speeds of up to 152 km/h. From Friday noon until yesterday, the low “Zeynep” (Arabic: desert flower) lashed the northern half of the country at 162 km/h. State of emergency! The double storm caused flooding, destruction and deaths.

In the capital alone, the fire brigade counted 7,800 missions from Thursday to noon yesterday – 3,200 of them due to the weather. For comparison: In 2017, storm “Xavier” raged across Northern and Eastern Europe. At that time, the Berlin fire brigade had to turn out 3,000 times. “So it’s even worse than it was then,” said a fire department spokesman for BILD am SONNTAG.


In Berlin, large parts of the roof of a Charité center have come off

In Berlin, large parts of the roof of a Charité center have come offPhoto: Jörg Carstensen/dpa

The north was also hit particularly hard. According to the German Weather Service, the highest value was measured on Saturday night at around 162 km/h at the North Sea lighthouse “Alte Weser”.

On the North Sea island of Wangerooge, the waves swallowed up almost the entire sandy beach on Friday night, and in Bremen a 55-meter-high construction crane fell on a shell.

In Hamburg, the water level at the St. Pauli gauge reached 3.75 meters above the mean high water level yesterday morning. This corresponds to about 5.90 meters above sea level (experts speak of a “very severe storm surge” from 3.50 meters).


storm surge!  In Hamburg's warehouse district, firefighters rescue a man from his car

storm surge! In Hamburg’s warehouse district, firefighters rescue a man from his carPhoto: Daniel Bockwoldt/dpa

Parts of the Speicherstadt and Hafencity were also flooded. BILD am SONNTAG reporter Peter Wilke reported from Hamburg-Bahrenfeld, where a tree fell on two parked cars on Friday afternoon. In the Hanseatic city there were 654 weather-related operations between Friday 5 p.m. and Saturday 6 a.m. Train traffic was completely idle until yesterday afternoon.

BILD am SONNTAG reporter Michael Engelberg also experienced how violent the storm was in Greven (NRW). There, a 100-year-old linden tree (more than 30 meters high) fell into Anke Röwe’s house. The woman was unharmed: “The fact that these roots, which are several meters deep, could not withstand the storm, makes you aware of the force of nature.”


In Neukölln (Berlin), car owners were unlucky - their car was completely destroyed by a tree

In Neukölln (Berlin), car owners were unlucky – their car was completely destroyed by a treePhoto: spreepicture

In NRW, the storm led to a total of 300 traffic accidents, and the fire brigade deployed more than 12,000 storms. In Essen, a man was hit on the head by a falling roof tile on Friday evening and was seriously injured.


In Gelsenkirchen (NRW) the storm swept a flat roof onto the street and several cars

In Gelsenkirchen (NRW) the storm swept a flat roof onto the street and several carsPhoto: Gelsenkirchen Fire Department

Gusts of up to 150 km/h swept across the Brocken (Saxony-Anhalt). BILD am SONNTAG reporter Hannes Ravic reported on Friday at almost 0 degrees and a snowstorm from 1141 meters high.


In Klettbach (Thuringia), an approximately 270-year-old post windmill was completely destroyed by the gusts

In Klettbach (Thuringia), an approximately 270-year-old post windmill was completely destroyed by the gustsPhoto: Bodo Schackow/dpa

Winter storm “Ylenia” alone could cost Germany’s insurers 500 million euros – according to experts, the total damage over the past three days will be in the billions.

And there is still no calm after the storm. Tonight there are violent hurricane gusts on the North Sea and in the west with up to 100 km/h. “So it’s not over yet,” says qualified meteorologist Dominik Jung from wetter.net. “Storm depression “Antonia” is already ready.”


Germany out of breath: Zeynep rages through Germany at 162 km/h
Photo: BILD

So the storm raged through Europe


ENGLAND In Newhaven, the meter-high waves almost swallowed up the lighthouse.  In London, the highest warning level

In Newhaven, England, the meter-high waves almost swallowed up the lighthouse. In London, the highest warning level “red” was declared for the first time since this category was introduced in 2011. Overall, the storm, which is called “Eunice” here, claimed three lives. More than 400,000 homes were without power on Friday night.Photo: Matt Dunham/AP


HOLLAND At the Reguliersgracht canal in Amsterdam, the trees tipped over into the water due to the strong gusts.  A total of four people died in the storm in Holland.  In The Hague, a church tower collapsed so badly

On the Reguliersgracht canal in Amsterdam, the trees fell into the water due to the strong gusts. A total of four people died in the storm in Holland. In The Hague, a church tower shook so badly that 20 houses in the neighborhood had to be evacuated.Photo: REMKO DE WAAL/AFP


POLAND In the town of Dobrzyca, up to 40 houses were damaged by the storm - some are uninhabitable.  At a construction site in Kraków, a 30-meter high crane fell on four construction workers - two of them

In the town of Dobrzyca in Poland, up to 40 houses were damaged by the storm – some are uninhabitable. At a construction site in Kraków, a 30-meter high crane fell on four construction workers – two of them died. Another man was killed by a tree in his car in the west of the country.Photo: PIOTR SKORNICKI/AGENCJA WYBORCZA

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