At the Théâtre de La Colline, the joyful ode to Fellini



A choir slowly advances on the immense sand-covered plateau skirting large hanging white curtains, and gently intones a love song: “What would I do away from you, pain of the soul, without seeing you, without having you, without looking at you…” The next moment is a scene ofA particular day, by Ettore Scola (1977) which is played. Abandoned Antonietta searches for her parrot which has flown away, and meets Gabriele on the roof of their building on this sad day of fascist parade…

Bold succession of paintings

The tone is set for 28 i mig (“28 ½”), a generous, cheerful, bubbling show where music, dance, circus, poetry, literature, theater and cinema mingle and tangle, carried away by the formidable troupe of the Catalan company La Perla 29 whose energy and the pleasure of playing burst forth at every moment.

→ CRITICAL. “137 fainting spells”: Chekhov with a beating heart

“How do we make ourselves happy? » This question of happiness posed by Gabriele crosses the room, just like that of the meaning of creation, with its pangs, its doubts, its dazzling too… Federico Fellini knew it well when he filmed eight and a half (1963), to whom Oriol Broggi pays a vibrant tribute.

The director refrains from nothing, dares everything in this incredibly daring succession of scenes, sometimes joyful, sometimes melancholy. We embark with him, happy to immerse ourselves again, for two hours, in the cult scenes of world cinema projected on a giant screen – the frantic race towards the death of Anna Magnani in Rome open city (1945), the sensual dance of Claudia Cardinale and Burt Lancaster in Cheetah (1963), the brilliance of the eyes of Lawrence of Arabia contemplating the desert…

A maelstrom of images and words

In this maelstrom of images, the words invite themselves, taking their ease, covering the walls of the theater in as many quotations, sentences, passages drawn from the masterpieces of literature – The Divine Comedy, Hamlet, Uncle Vanya… Words chanted, declaimed, also mixed by the actors, in Catalan and Italian, who alternately become singers, dancers, jugglers, musicians to express the beauty and fragility of art. In the middle of this literary and cinematographic whirlwind, a horse, a real one, placid and proud, walks on the stage, a backfiring scooter comes to pick up Federico at the end of a day of filming, a boat crosses the set in the middle of ‘a storm…
” There is no end. There is no beginning. There is only the infinite passion of life. » In the mirror of Fellini’s words is thus reflected all the theater in the world, illusory but heroic, generously offered to our gaze. And who better than Marcello Mastroianni, the Maestro’s favorite actor, could end this joyful ode to creation. His giant portrait is displayed at the back of the stage with these words: “Thank you for life. »

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